Truth-telling, trust and e-cigarettes

Truth-telling, trust and e-cigarettes

Headshot of Dana Scully from The X-Files, with caption "MULDER, THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE, BUT SO ARE LIES."

Lange, M. (1994, February 11). The X-Files. Young at Heart. 20th Century Fox Television.

It should go without saying that public health institutions and researchers have an obligation to tell the truth. In principle, there aren’t many stakeholders in e-cigarette research who would argue otherwise. But questions about whose truth and how information about e-cigarettes should be communicated have been highly controversial.

Partly this is because e-cigarettes haven’t been around long (relatively speaking), and research takes time.

But while influential figures on all sides of the e-cigarette debate in the US have increasingly acknowledged a body of evidence that vaping is less harmful than combustible cigarettes, the US public has increasingly come to believe the opposite. It’s unlikely that this outcome results from even-handed cautions against jumping to conclusions. People have been inundated with a particular message about the current state of research on vaping, and that message is false. Continue reading

Getting to a place of stability

Getting to a place of stability

Tower of Jenga blocks

CC BY-SA Guma89

This respondent was a foster youth who recently transitioned to independent status in terms of the state. She had been on the streets in the past, but she currently lives with her girlfriend and attends a vocational program to be a chef.

She said she smokes to relieve stress. “The City is losing manners… value and dignity,” she feels, and she said there isn’t much respect anymore. She smokes when feeling disrespected, and got a cannabis card to keep from “spazzing out” from work stressors.

She gave up drinking recently, but is surrounded by people who still imbibe and says she experiences pressure to go out socially where she may be tempted to drink. When she drinks, she smokes more. She said she’s not ready to quit smoking yet, but she is monitoring her smoking. She also enjoys vaping, but says vaping is, “kinda like halfways…not as fulfilling as a whole cigarette.” She noted trends that at first vaping was supposed to be better for you, but that now it seems e-cigarettes are not as good for you.

For single Black mothers and young Black men, she believes, it can take a long time to get to a place of stability (financially, emotionally and with family) to feel able to quit. By the time one gets to that place, generally one has children already, and they’ll have seen what you’re doing and be emulating it.  Of kids, she noted: “You see it, you do it.”

E-cigarettes

E-cigarettes

E-Cigarette (CC BY-SA Izuan Izam)

E-Cigarette (CC BY-SA Izuan Izam)

There’s a lot of discussion today about e-cigarettes. Will they help current smokers quit smoking? Will they jeopardize public health efforts that aim to make cigarette smoking socially unacceptable, or could their popularity further denormalize cigarette smoking? Will they be a gateway into cigarette smoking for young people? If e-cigarettes are less harmful than conventional cigarettes, does stigmatizing e-cigarettes threaten public health efforts?

Our current California Smoking Study, which focuses on cigarette smoking and the ways in which smoking stigma may have variable impacts on different communities, suggests that there is a need for additional research into the social and cultural meanings of e-cigarettes specifically, so that we can begin to understand their “promise or peril”. Continue reading